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Dexamethasone, Everything you Need to Know

• Dexamethasone is a type of corticosteroid medication. It is used in the treatment of many conditions, including rheumatic problems, a number of skin diseases, severe allergies, asthma, and chronic obstructive lung disease.


• In a breakthrough discovery the widely available steroid drug dexamethasone may be the key in helping to treat the sickest Covid-19 patients who require ventilation or oxygen, according to researchers in the United Kingdom.


• Dexamethasone is typically used to treat arthritis, severe allergies, and asthma, among other lung-related diseases, including certain types of cancer. The possible side effects can range from slight stomach ache, headache, and dizziness to serious cases insomnia, and even depression.


• The two lead investigators stated in a virtual press conference that “In the trial, dexamethasone was provided at a dose of 6mg once a day for up to 10 days, administered either as an injection or taken orally.” The researchers have not reported any serious issues of adverse events among the patients who were taking dexamethasone under observations, but the results are preliminary and may potentially prove to be the first step finding a definite cure for the virus.


• “It's a readily available, cheap, and well-understood drug, even at the time of SARS1 in 2003, steroids were used, but at very different doses. Some of the studies showed harm from steroids in SARS, some said there are possible benefits. A meta-analysis in 29 different studies in SARS was inconclusive. There have also been inconclusive results on MERS coronavirus and also influenza.” Peter Horby, the chief investigator for the Recovery Trial and a professor at the University of Oxford, said on Tuesday.


• All said and done, Dexamethasone might just prove to be the solution we’ve all been waiting for, and surely this is a sign of better things to come.


Reporter: Manish JS.

Bangalore, India | epicenter.newsmedia@gmail.com

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